Skip to main content

About this Show

BBC World News

News/Business. International issues. (CC) (Stereo)




Annapolis, MD, USA

Comcast Cable

Channel 78 (549 MHz)






Tokyo 4, New York 4, Fukushima 3, Raymond Davis 2, Newman 2, Catherine T. Macarthur 2, John D. 2, Honolulu 2, Bahrain 2, Pakistan 2, Us 2, Vermont 2, Stowe 2, Mahmoud Abbas 1, Gaddafi 1, Abc News 1, Cia 1, The City 1, Big City 1, Bbc News 1,
Borrow a DVD
of this show
  WHUT    BBC World News    News/Business.  
   International issues. (CC) (Stereo)  

    March 16, 2011
    7:00 - 7:30am EDT  

>> this is "bbc world news." funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. and union bank. >> union bank has put its global expertise to work for a wide range of companies.
from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> worke t-o reenter fukushima nuclear plant in japan as the battle to control it. increasing temperatures and snow hit the worst affected f -- areas. half of a million refugees are living in television shot -- living in shelters. in a rare television address, the japanese emperor addresses the public. also in this program, renewed unrest in bahrain as security forces clear anti-government demonstrators. pakistan has indicted a cia contractor on two counts of murder.
workers at the japanese fukushima nuclear plant have returned to the site after earlier having to abandon it. steam was seen coming from the site as they attempted to cool the facility. japanese media reports said that fears for radiation levels above the plant. >> hello and welcome to tokyo. five days after that devastating earthquake and tsunami, the crisis continues. today there are reports of another fire in a helicopter
that was called in to drop help -- to drop water had to turn back because of fears of radiation levels. despite that, government authorities are saying that radiation levels at the moment, while higher than normal, are not posing a risk to human beings are around the site. the 180 workers who had been trying to keep things under control have been allowed back in. although there is widespread nervousness here in japan around that site, radiation levels themselves are not deemed to be too severe at the moment. aftershocks here in tokyo, people here are used to that. but add to that the combination of the threat and risk of
nuclear plants, people are feeling alarmed. let's get the very latest >> the new tactic is to cool the reactor with a plan to dump water from above. it looks like a desperate measure. earlier there was steam billowing from reactor no. 3. >> workers have suspended operations. so, we have urged them to evacuate into a safe area. >> again, we have an emergency earthquake warning. >> the buildings are shaking at lunchtime. france told its citizens to leave the capital and get out of the country.
british advice is different -- avoid all non-essential travel to tokyo. radiation levels are reported to be slightly higher, but nowhere near dangerous. temperatures in the area worst affected by the quake, essential supplies are getting through. but there are concerns about conditions in evacuation centers, many of which are packed. >> 850,000 households in the north of this country are without power and electricity at the moment. tens of thousands of people are still missing. we have had regular updates from the prime minister, the fifth this country has had in five years. earlier today we heard from the
emperor, expressing his condolences for what japan was going through in this difficult time. >> the accident at nuclear power plant causes great worry. i hope that efforts by the staff can prevent the situation from getting worse. >> its still is not clear, of course, quite how many people have died. it would seem that the tsunami caused the most deaths in the area immediately affected. we have taken a look at the rescue efforts as teams go through the region's devastated by the water. >> the arrival of the evacuation center.
for some of these people, most of them elderly villagers, they have not been moved for some time. some, together with others whose homes were damaged in the earthquake. >> by m feeling extremely uneasy. there is hardly any information that i can use. the governor of the fukushima promise -- province said that the people have reached the limits of fear and anxiety. >> kerosene, gasoline, fuel, we are lacking everything. people have evacuated and temperatures are very low. children have evaluated the 500 different locations. for them to ride out the cold, we need help and the understanding of the rest of the
nation. >> snow blanketing the northeast complicate everything. including the search for any more that might survive and lie buried. as well as the vital business of getting supplies into the region. a patient is brought into the hospital, but like other medical facilities by an earthquake affected areas, this hospital faces increased -- increasingly difficult problems. >> i am not sure that we can get supplies. >> in some places, makeshift mortuary is remain standing. here this school gymnasium has become a temporary resting place. hear a chinese team is using specialized equipment to search
for any signs of life amongst the wreckage. still, there is the fear of more tsunamis. the hopes of finding people live diminishes over time. >> we flew in a few hours ago. at the airport outside tokyo we saw quite a number of foreign nationals desperate to get out of the country. some of the younger ones who said that their parents or perhaps more concerned than they were, but they were not taking any chances. tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands of japanese, as an alternative they have to go to the refugee centers. a few hours' drive north of where i am standing now, how many people are staying with
you? what are the conditions like there? >> conditions at this refugee center, which is an old school that authorities have taken over, they are housing 200 to 300 people at the moment. conditions are actually pretty good. behind me, officials working with refugees. those people that have lost their homes in the earthquake, the tsunami, or being evacuated. local people, very touching, they have been bringing in very little bundles of blankets, plopping them down on the ground here for the refugees by in this area.
we have books that have been left for the school children. many people are using the classrooms as shelter. the area devastated by the earthquake, this kind of area, this kind of building, it is perfect to house the people who have lost their homes. >> but this is only a short-term solution, is it not? it will take months, if not years, to rebuild the infrastructure. what will happen in a few weeks? where will these people be housed? >> no doubt about that, it is a short-term solution. the people being held here are a drop in the ocean compared to those displaced. ideally we would offer relief
for people who could manage in their own homes, but the problem is getting relief into those areas. roads and bridges have been destroyed. there is a u.s. naval ship off the coast here that is patrolling up and down the coast, being used as a jumping off point for japanese helicopters to drop supplies in the affected areas. long-term, these people will have to return to their homes. certainly for the people around the fukushima nuclear plant, they can deal with those issues as fast as possible. as far as others in the earthquake zone are concerned, it will be many months.
>> that you very much. we have another correspondent there, looking at the conditions for those people that are not able to use the refugee accommodations. >> ? gupta -- yamagata, the city 100 kilometers north of the stricken fukushima reactor. there is so much to worry about here. the earthquake cut off vital supply chains. at this family own shop, they are almost out of food. >> i am concerned because we do not know how long this is going to go on. even here on my shelf i do not know that i have enough to survive. >> everyone is worried about radiation.
her parents will not go outside. they have stocked up on face masks. they tell us that it is all that they can do. >> i would not know where else to go. i never thought of leaving my home. you cannot see radiation, can you? >> there are conflicting reports about how much radiation may or may not be headed this direction. every day brings a fresh analysis. >> they will tell you hear that these are such uncertain times. >> i mentioned that when we arrived a few hours ago, we came across several nationalities of people trying to leave. looking for a flight back to the states or australia.
the french government has decided to bring a lot of its nationals home. >> the sarkozy government was criticized for the way that it reacted to the problems in tunisia. the prime minister was replaced a couple of weeks ago, criticized by their own diplomats about how slowly they reacted. they moved quickly on getting nationals out of libya. now they are keen to show that they understand the situation in japan and are acting to protect the interests of their own citizens. nonetheless, since monday we have had statements urging french nationals with non- essential business to leave the country. as well as warnings from the nuclear safety administration. they feel that the japanese are downplaying the problem. the japanese government put this
on this -- as a four of a scale of one to seven, the french government has put this at a six, just one level below chernobyl. they are certainly taking it seriously. >> it is worth pointing out how bitterly cold it is in japan at this time of year. for anyone struggling without heat or water, conditions are going to be very grim indeed. it has seen so much in the last 50 or 60 years, facing a huge challenge, seismically and economically. the crisis here is set to last for many months to come.
>> thank you very much, tim. you are watching "bbc world news." security forces clear anti- government demonstrators. there have been a number of deaths. let's get more on japan. meanwhile, a lucky few have managed to escape the chaos by going overseas. some travelers are headed for jfk airport in new york city. >> international arrivals at the airport, but there is nothing routine about the experience of passengers coming from japan. they have left the country scarred by catastrophe. this 11-year-old was evacuated
from the disaster zone. >> there was an earthquake in japan. everything fell. tsunami came. it was so scary. >> what happened to you? how did you get out? >> i got out with my friend because i was in the school. my parents came to pick me up. >> somehow her family managed to escape. >> there are many people helping desperate. >> for those waiting for flights back to japan, it is difficult and unsettling. while they have been away, the country has undergone a transformative experience. they do not know what they will be returning to. >> we met one woman who was
saying goodbye to her sister and mother. >> they're very worried. they are not exactly sure what happened. >> for japanese passengers there are mixed emotions. concern over who eur holds. abc news, new york. -- bbc news, new york. >> you are watching "bbc world news." teams are battling to control the damage in japan as they are attempting to re-enter the facility, they were forced out earlier by a spike in the, radiation levels. in a rare television address, the japanese emperor discussed the unprecedented scale of the tragedy. we understand that mahmoud abbas
is saying that he bluffed stand for reelection. that comes with another story coming to us having to do with a delay in the government to give them a chance to join the unity government. telling the world that he will not stand for reelection. security forces have cleared anti-government forces from the main square for two days after the government entered the country. dozens have been wounded, the interior minister claims that a member of the security forces died of injuries. military vehicles, including tanks, set up by the demonstrators. keith, we have the latest pictures on this and. take us through what happened.
>> at dawn troops and personnel carriers with tanks, helicopters, clearing the square with tear gas and water. the area was covered in smoke. looking at the area around the streets, it is a bit like a ghost town. the protesters simply could not resist, setting fire to the tires around the area, calling on more protesters. they were driven out. as you say, many ended up in homes around here because of the situation at local hospitals. also seen as the center of
protests here. the government and the military says they have restored, to the country. >> roads into the area, we understand that they were effectively sealed off by security forces. the people doing the healing, were those the external forces brought in a few days ago? >> it would appear not. they look closely to be military relief. the military set up the road blocks here to secure the area. we have not heard any reports to back that up. in this operation this would be completely incendiary, setting off another round of protests and violence.
i would be surprised, as bahrain does not have a sizable army of its own. >> all right, thank you very much. forces loyal to colonel gaddafi have launched an attack using heavy artillery and tanks. meanwhile, government forces maintain their attack by an to buy. rebels are in retreat, they say that they still confront the road that links the two cities. john says that information is still rebel-held. >> we spoke to a general on the inside who said that the opposition is still in control but government forces are around. for the moment, that seems to be
the new front line. over 100 kilometers from been gauzy -- bengazi. even then, this is a big city. there are big doubts about the government and what they're trying to do. are they serious about attacking with these relatively small forces at their disposal? >> syrian security forces breakout gatherings outside damascus after demonstrations demanding political freedom. a court has indicted the cia contractor, raymond davis, in the connection the shooting two men in january. he declared that he was defending himself and that he has diplomatic immunity.
further straining pakistani relations with the united states. >> local media are reporting that the charges of double murder have not been formally laid. we are still waiting for lawyers to come out on both sides and make their official statements. strangely, even though there is a question of immunity, it has not been decided by the pakistani court. there was a separate hearing on monday in the issue was resolved and kicked back to the trial court to decide. even though these charges are in play, the issue of community has yet to be resolved. the vienna convention confers diplomatic immunity on raymond davis, declaring that he should be freed. >> what is the atmosphere like? >> there has been a tremendous
amount of tension and anger about this case. it is worth remembering that the incident happened in broad daylight, at a busy intersection, one of the largest cities in pakistan. he fired 10 bullets, killing two men in broad daylight. the police accused him of cold- blooded murder. they do not accept his claim that he was firing in self- defense. there has been tremendous strain on the u.s. pakistan relations because of this case. >> we will show you both sets of pictures here at the same time. tanks, tear gas, helicopters,
workers damaged by the earthquake. for more news -- for more news. >> hello and welcome. >> see the news unfold, get the top stories from around the globe and click-to-play video reports. go to to experience the in-depth, expert reporting of "bbc world news" online. >> funding was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. and union bank. >> union bank has put its
global financial strength to work for a wide range of companies. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet lo